Mendicant Bias
A few years into the post-war era have passed yet there still haven't been any word on reforging the Covenant with humanity, Thel specifically spoke of recreating the  Covenant as lines within Halo 3. Another issue i see present without any reasonable consideration at curtailing is Jiralhanae raids, both issues i think tie together.

Understandably after any form of genocide or slavery has been abolished those on the receiving will suffer effects for generations to come not to mention unofficial continuing of such practices. However on an official level UNSC and Sangheili forces are committed to an armistice which is why stopping factions within who would encourage war have been meat with swift force from both parties.However there doesn't seem to be thought of forging a lasting peace with each side justifiably more focused on maintain order within their own courts.
   As the Covenant failed Jiralhanae regressed back into their tier four state as prior to joining the conglomerate, their numbers have been spread too thin without any reasonable system of resource production or protection. Naturally whatever ships remaining in their possession have been utilize for ravaging border worlds of their resources to maintain Dosaic with the already detested Jiralhanae being hunted into extinction by some Sangheili forces.


While the wounds haven't even begun to heal for Humanity as several centuries of progress were obliterated within 30 years obvious hostilities with any alien faction aren't warrented regardless of current "superiority". On an official level i'm miffed as to why there hasn't been a formation of some sort of council let alone qasi-modern Covenant to properly maintain relations and direct everyone further post-war.  If not for all races as a whole at the very least Sangheili,Humans, and Kig-yar to make sure conflicts don't arise during resettlement operations,out of contact fleets don't engage, resources of either group are properly reported and so on. There seems to be a complete lack of organization which leads to evens like Carrow, could better prevent such events as Didact's awakening and Draetheus V.



Such a  committee/Covenant would also manage dissident post-war faction such as Jiralhanae who seem to be attacking without reason on the surface but are only doing so due to threat of starvation.  A resource rich system could be found near Dosaic if not far from UNSC/Sangheili space with efforts made to make it a primary Jiralhanae settlement. Being a tier 4 race more focused on war simply leveling them with basic infrastructure,knowledge,provisions then leaving would make Jiralhanae responsible for their own fate. While such a gesture may seems too extensive the potential of the Jiralhanae should they become more mature shouldn't be discarded especially when life seems rather rare in the galaxy as of late.



Ultimately i find the post-war era spinning in circles without any focused direction advancements seems to be more technological based and shallow than social with the intent of a progressive future.  There was a time were a Human-Sangheili Covenant seemed eventual with immediate (even if limited) exchanged of tech and data with that narrative taking a depressing backseat for surface level civilian perspectives.
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AOK
 A few years into the post-war era have passed yet there still haven't been any word on reforging the Covenant with humanity, Thel specifically spoke of recreating the  Covenant as lines within Halo 3. Another issue i see present without any reasonable consideration at curtailing is Jiralhanae raids, both issues i think tie together.

There seems to be one line that I could find that speaks of this, which is "There was honor in our Covenant once... and there shall be once again!" This could otherwise mean his efforts to create the Swords of Sangheilios, which in essence has some of the former client species instead of volunteering for the new war effort. However, the UEG isn't "a member" of the SOS and is treated more like an ally, and at select moments as well over the years. With regards to the Jiralhanae raids, well, in terms of a "new Covenant" (one that is headed by virtuous values and not by deceit and glory like Jul' Mdama's failed attempt at the Covenant) that would mean the SOS and whatever major ruling faction of the Jiralhanae would have to first negotiate peace talks before heading down that avenue. That attempt has also failed, due to mercenary sabotage. One major element to take note of is that these three interstellar species have multiple internecine conflicts, and at the time of the original founding of the Covenant, the original signers of the Writ of Union were, at best, mostly united in their goals. Save for the Rending.
 Understandably after any form of genocide or slavery has been abolished those on the receiving will suffer effects for generations to come not to mention unofficial continuing of such practices. However on an official level UNSC and Sangheili forces are committed to an armistice which is why stopping factions within who would encourage war have been meat with swift force from both parties.However there doesn't seem to be thought of forging a lasting peace with each side justifiably more focused on maintain order within their own courts.
 
While you're right that the idea of maintaining order between the two governments haven't been thought of, I would like to say the JOZ's, as new as they are, are a good first step for this concept. Highly volatile space with pirates coming and going, intercepted by perhaps a merged UNSC-SOS fleet. We don't have many details about how the JOZ's are strictly monitored, but one can imagine at this stage.
(accidental post, wanted to reply paragraph by paragraph but that didn't work lmao) 
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Mendicant Bias
AOK wrote:

There seems to be one line that I could find that speaks of this, which is "There was honor in our Covenant once... and there shall be once again!" This could otherwise mean his efforts to create the Swords of Sangheilios, which in essence has some of the former client species instead of volunteering for the new war effort. However, the UEG isn't "a member" of the SOS and is treated more like an ally, and at select moments as well over the years. With regards to the Jiralhanae raids, well, in terms of a "new Covenant" (one that is headed by virtuous values and not by deceit and glory like Jul' Mdama's failed attempt at the Covenant) that would mean the SOS and whatever major ruling faction of the Jiralhanae would have to first negotiate peace talks before heading down that avenue. That attempt has also failed, due to mercenary sabotage. One major element to take note of is that these three interstellar species have multiple internecine conflicts, and at the time of the original founding of the Covenant, the original signers of the Writ of Union were, at best, mostly united in their goals. Save for the Rending.


I've interpreted SoS as the defacto representation of Sangheili government considering this is Thel's faction who works directly with UEG/UNSC.
My point barred peace talks as neither side is interested in talking, simply create an outpost with basic infrastructure on a resource rich world, round the Brutes up and drop them off.  If the continue fighting and die off so be it, otherwise there may be a sliver chance of relations further down the line.


My proposal of a committee would be to discuss the issues with the other factions so they are also aware and could possibly provide aid. For instance SoS could be made clear that the Innies do not represent the bulk of humanity or UEG/UNSC whatsoever to prevent their actions reflecting all of us. However, while the Innies loathe UNSC they may be open to some SoS influence which could lead to more controlled colonies like Venezia.

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While you're right that the idea of maintaining order between the two governments haven't been thought of, I would like to say the JOZ's, as new as they are, are a good first step for this concept.


There isn't any cohesive oversight to this however which is how Carrow became an incident not to mention an utter lack of sense. Sangheili shouldn't have been allowed to resettle on a world which was formerly under human control unless majority of the population was confirmed dead and expressed zero interest in returning. How ever Sangheili asked permission from the UEG and SoS to settle which was done in remembrance of past crimes. Later on the original inhabitants return to recolonize only to find the same species who tried to wipe out the planet settling there, and these aren't UEG sympathizers either.


The situation didn't have any organization or sense to it which created a volatile situation. An oversight committee would be responsible for foreseeing and prevent such circumstances.
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Voka
I think that ship sailed a long time ago to be honest. I think if the Halo universe was going to head in the direction of there being greater integration of species - which is to say less tribalism of race and the disentanglement of nation and species, and a reduced role for species to play in defining one's identity - then we might have seen it developed by now in the narrative. Instead it has only been the opposite - 343i going balls deep with the idea that humanity must ascend, advance technologically and reclaim the Mantle, and at nearly every stage inter-species affairs has been portrayed as a zero-sum game. They have written the post-Halo 3 setting such that the political boundaries are racial, and there's practically no other issues in the setting to make a conflict out of (A necessity if they want to run with the idea that humanity are the reclaimers, which won't work if the political and social boundaries between the species are very fuzzy and practically meaningless). Fundamentally in order for the idea of a cosmopolitan society or agreement to work, the trope that each species must be a nation has to be broken. Otherwise it doesn't make sense. I honestly just can't imagine in the current Halo setting the scenario of a Sangheili protecting his Grunt or Kig-Yar friend from some drunken Sangheili thugs. Such a nuanced view of things just isn't in Halo's fiber. Given the hostility that Legacy of Onyx received from the fanbase particularly due to portraying something that was very close to a cosmopolitan society, I don't think such a view is in the fanbase's fiber either. It seems that people really do just want either limitless vomiting forth of Human-Covenant war prequel material, or endless rote repetition of generic post-war racial tensions that wobble ever precariously near to the breakout point of all out war.

Whenever the thought of the prospect of any kind of cosmopolitan society existing in Halo comes up, remember this quote from Halo 5:

"The Brass want nothing to do with the Arbiter's war"

That's the kind of scope of vision 343i's writers have. The fact that such a sentence is manifestly untrue to anyone who has even played a small part of Spartan Ops or read a single issue of Halo: Escalation only serves to show what a solid commitment to mediocre narratives 343i have made.
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Mendicant Bias
Voka wrote:
I think that ship sailed a long time ago to be honest. I think if the Halo universe was going to head in the direction of there being greater integration of species - which is to say less tribalism of race and the disentanglement of nation and species, and a reduced role for species to play in defining one's identity - then we might have seen it developed by now in the narrative. Instead it has only been the opposite - 343i going balls deep with the idea that humanity must ascend, advance technologically and reclaim the Mantle, and at nearly every stage inter-species affairs has been portrayed as a zero-sum game. They have written the post-Halo 3 setting such that the political boundaries are racial, and there's practically no other issues in the setting to make a conflict out of (A necessity if they want to run with the idea that humanity are the reclaimers, which won't work if the political and social boundaries between the species are very fuzzy and practically meaningless). Fundamentally in order for the idea of a cosmopolitan society or agreement to work, the trope that each species must be a nation has to be broken. Otherwise it doesn't make sense. I honestly just can't imagine in the current Halo setting the scenario of a Sangheili protecting his Grunt or Kig-Yar friend from some drunken Sangheili thugs. Such a nuanced view of things just isn't in Halo's fiber. Given the hostility that Legacy of Onyx received from the fanbase particularly due to portraying something that was very close to a cosmopolitan society, I don't think such a view is in the fanbase's fiber either. It seems that people really do just want either limitless vomiting forth of Human-Covenant war prequel material, or endless rote repetition of generic post-war racial tensions that wobble ever precariously near to the breakout point of all out war.

Whenever the thought of the prospect of any kind of cosmopolitan society existing in Halo comes up, remember this quote from Halo 5:

"The Brass want nothing to do with the Arbiter's war"

That's the kind of scope of vision 343i's writers have. The fact that such a sentence is manifestly untrue to anyone who has even played a small part of Spartan Ops or read a single issue of Halo: Escalation only serves to show what a solid commitment to mediocre narratives 343i have made.



The idea of Human ascension doesn't quite vibe with me well because there isn't much sense in having vast technologies without the social responsibility or defined morality to make use of them. How can ONI be prevented from using such advances for nefarious means, what would stop the Innies from getting hold of them, how would other races feel with a race previously on the verge of genocide being a sole galactic power? I'm aware of the thread but haven't paid much attention as it would take another decade if not two of directly building upon the plot via Forerunner-Human foundation which was immediately scrapped after implementation.  Honestly, it seems the same issue (I had at least) with Bungie's lack of defined direction is happening with Halo 3 which means this is absolutely on Microsoft.


While there are instances were it seems progressive advances are being made between Humans and Xeno's it is almost always para-military in nature nothing aside from Kig-Yar and Humans interacting through trade. Do we even have trading with the Sangheili to any capacity?  There seem to be insignificant pieces pointing towards eventual cultural homogenization  within the novels whereas games depict nothing more fighting between the Covenant not Covenant. Barring Halo 4 we've essentially been fighting the Covenant for nearly 20 years real time with the war lasting 29-31 years in-universe,which is utter lunacy.  At some they'll have to acknowledge mindlessly fighting Covenant isn't going to create a sustainable franchise especially with the novel universe being far more expansive.


I Honestly don't understand how Thel can have  a positive view of Humanity at this point either considering the UNSC has forces to help end his war overnight, i think that would make things even considering his forces saved us from genocide.
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Voka
The idea of Human ascension doesn't quite vibe with me well because there isn't much sense in having vast technologies without the social responsibility or defined morality to make use of them.

I think Halo is simply to turn into a power fantasy. There has been substantial detail in the narrative about how humanity must be given all this powerful technology and how it must ascend to be the next superpower and essentially rule the galaxy by decree through having the right to enforce the Mantle of Responsibility. There has, by contrast, been absolutely no discussion in the narrative about any of the required and equally huge societal changes that must occur within humanity in order for any of this reclaimer nonsense to have any glimmer of credibility. Instead it's all about the power and the prestige that humans will have, and nothing about the limitations of that power, the boundaries of that prestige and the responsibilities and costs of having those two things.

Do we honestly see the UEG and ONI choosing to sacrifice themselves to save alien species? I don't think they would. I think they'd rather burn the galaxy to save themselves, even if such a thing were not possible.

Will humans use their power to create a galaxy of opportunity, or will they use it to benefit themselves at the expense of everybody else like the Forerunners did? I'm having trouble believing that humans exclusively wielding the gavel won't result in another Ecumene. The UNSC's treatment of colonies that want to secede is a stark warning against them being allowed to become a galactic superpower imo, because it shows how deeply entrenched hegemony and centralized governance are within the mindsets of those who walk the halls of power there. I certainly don't anticipate ONI ceasing their efforts to make every other species grovel at human feet through any means necessary, whether that be through the creation and utilization of gruesome biological WMDs or through stoking conflicts that kill and displace billions.

And yet, all of this Reclaimer stuff is only occurring in the narrative because the Librarian decided that humans should be the Forerunner's heir and because her AI after-essence decides that this is still an appropriate thing to do. The Librarian, who is supposed to be concerned about the greater notion of life in the Milky Way, wants to give the keys to the galaxy to a species that is basically completely unfit for that position based on everything we know about them. Choosing a single species is a very, very poor idea for this Mantle or Responsibility nonsense, but if one was to do it then said species should not be deeply entrenched within a culture of circumstantial xenophobia, militarism, authoritarianism, and centralized and hegemonic government with zero accountability. Why in the world would anyone want to reward this type of culture with unlimited power? That is a question I think needs to be addressed, because the credibility of this entire series is missing until it's addressed imo.

It's all about the power and the prestige. That's all that's important in Halo with regards to this Mantle stuff. No one cares about how utterly arrogant this Reclaimer stuff is in the proposition that we, humanity, should and ever could know what is best for a galaxy of many alien cultures many of which are thousands of years older than us. How delusional do people have to be to buy into this? It also just reeks of ethnocentrism in the way that humans are treated as god's gift to the galaxy; race based theories of nationalism in how humans alone must uphold the Mantle, and how the UNSC keeping other species at arms length and enforcing near total loyalty to itself among humans doesn't even seem to be so much as a small problem for the LIbrarian's AI, and echoes of the White Man's Burden in how it is humanity's duty to enforce some sort of environment on the galaxy through the necessity of there being something enforced on it in the first place - and how only humans are capable of doing that.

Whoever is directing this narrative is insane. I'm sorry, but I can't think of any other word to describe how completely detached from reality one would have to be in order to write a narrative like this. It's completely crazy.

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How can ONI be prevented from using such advances for nefarious means

There's nothing to stop them. According to Halo: Helljumper, the Forerunner's possessed the knowledge to wage a genocide so complete that they could destroy every last DNA strand of a species. And now this knowledge will fall into the hands of ONI.

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what would stop the Innies from getting hold of them,

Nothing either. They could create a Grey Goo that would convert the mass of a planet into replicators using a seed smaller than a pea. Forerunner technology would likely give them worse ideas than that.

And then there's the question of what kinds of suppression ONI could develop from these technologies that would ensure complete submission within the masses of humanity towards their rule.

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how would other races feel with a race previously on the verge of genocide being a sole galactic power?

Imagine you had a classmate that you didn't really get a long with; he called you nasty names and you did the same back, and you got into fights often. Imagine that you got consistently better grades than he did, but then one day you were ill, you couldn't sleep, couldn't study well the night before and subsequently you ended up getting a slightly lower mark than he did on the next test. Imagine then that your teacher moved him up to a higher class based on that test alone and you stayed the same despite having a better track record of attainment. Next, imagine that he is then made into a school captain despite the nasty things he has said and done to you personally (Which you are also guilty yourself of doing to him). You might feel a little resentful.

The elevation of humanity onto a pedestal that it does not deserve by any metric likely creates a scenario where the other species will feel resentful. Intrinsic to the very idea of having bearers of the Mantle of Responsibility is the idea of the Worthy and the Unworthy; those worthy to hold the Mantle and those who are not. Or maybe it could be simplified to just those who hold the Mantle versus those who don't, emphasizing that the difference is about possession rather than worthiness. There's probably always going to be a degree of tension between those two groups, because the situation in the case of Worthiness implies that one side is inferior in some way to the other. In the case of possession, tension may arise from one side coveting the Mantle that the other side currently possesses. So in humanity being worthy of the Mantle, or in merely possessing the Mantle, it means that all the other species are either unworthy or cannot possess the same prestige as humans. That means that there will be tension between them, unfortunately. This would be a corrosive poison that would destroy any credible foundation that would be needed to weave a peaceful cosmopolitan society. It's elevating one group above another unjustly, and the troubled history between the two groups makes it a whole lot worse. Then, to make matters even worse, it is imposing this tension across racial lines by making each of these groups a species - meaning that it will align with the more traditional prejudices and xenophobia that occurs between different species.

As the Human-Forerunner war showed us, this ended up being a disaster. The Librarian is a sinister moron.

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I'm aware of the thread but haven't paid much attention as it would take another decade if not two of directly building upon the plot via Forerunner-Human foundation which was immediately scrapped after implementation.  Honestly, it seems the same issue (I had at least) with Bungie's lack of defined direction is happening with Halo 3 which means this is absolutely on Microsoft.

I don't think 343i have much, if any, creative freedom given the number of plot threads they have left dangling and the sharp turns they have made in the narrative between Halo 4 and 5. Due to that I don't really make a distinction between them and Microsoft anymore.


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While there are instances were it seems progressive advances are being made between Humans and Xeno's it is almost always para-military in nature nothing aside from Kig-Yar and Humans interacting through trade. Do we even have trading with the Sangheili to any capacity?  There seem to be insignificant pieces pointing towards eventual cultural homogenization  within the novels whereas games depict nothing more fighting between the Covenant not Covenant. Barring Halo 4 we've essentially been fighting the Covenant for nearly 20 years real time with the war lasting 29-31 years in-universe,which is utter lunacy.  At some they'll have to acknowledge mindlessly fighting Covenant isn't going to create a sustainable franchise especially with the novel universe being far more expansive.

I guess Legacy of Onyx can be viewed as progress in relations if one squints their eyes hard enough and overlooks some fundamental problems the novel seems to raise about the prospect, but by and large inter-species relations are zero-sum and point-scoring exercises; everyone thinks that gains can only be made through expense to the other rather than mutual benefit; there is no trust; there are no meaningful emotional connections that could form the basis of anything like a friendship; and unhealthy competition and judgemental nitpicking with the goal of "one-upping" the other is all that most conversations and thoughts tend to consist of.

In other-words the exact same boring content they've been writing since 2011. Legacy of Onyx departs the most from this nauseating repetition, but it seems to point out how all the young people from each species tend to stay away from each other and how each species lives in their own neighborhoods and don't really intermingle outside of societal commitments like work and education.

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I Honestly don't understand how Thel can have  a positive view of Humanity at this point either considering the UNSC has forces to help end his war overnight, i think that would make things even considering his forces saved us from genocide.

What Thel thinks largely doesn't matter, unfortunately. Thel himself is barely even relevant anymore. 343i/Microsoft have more or less killed off his character by merely burying it underneath huge spans of time where nothing has been done with it. What was left was buried by the Infinity, ONI's stupid antics and the general consensus within the setting that humanity are unstoppable, which rendered him politically irrelevant within the setting. It wouldn't surprise me if they got away with killing him off soon because it feels as though he has actually become obscure. Nothing has been done with his character other than a few action cameos and mystical talks with Locke in Halo 5. His character development has been arrested since Halo 3; we don't know anything about him or what he thinks after all these earth shattering changes that have occurred in the setting and we know nothing about what his ambitions are. He's just not relevant anymore, which is very sad because he was easily one off the series' most intriguing and well written characters. I bet there are a lot of new Halo fans in the new generation who came on board with Halo 4 and 5 who don't know or care who the Arbiter is, which can't bode well for his character.
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Gob
Voka, I've always felt something with that narrative was "off" but could never put my finger on it. Your posts consistently put words to these feelings in a very concise and easy to digest way.
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