Mendicant Bias
Barring the legendary hands of Eric Nylund or Greg Bear what authors accurately depict the Haloverse or have a writing style which draws you in?


William Dietz- The Flood

Arguably one of the most disliked novels of early canon reason being it "simply" tells the story of CE frame by frame yet this is precisely why it is one of my favorite novels. Every detail of CE was perfectly captured while simultaneously giving us insight into what Cortana and Chief were thinking with each instance. Off-screen Covenant and ODST activity was covered such as the gruesome infiltrating of Alpha Base by cloaked Sangheili along with the endeavors of Zuka and Yayap as they tracked Chief across the ring. We were given rare perspective of the process of what being infected by an infection form, how it feels, the urges, loss of humanity and glimpses into higher Covenant interactions between San'Shyuum and Sangheili as well.
  Frankly, the prime reasoning for people disliking this novel is what makes it excellent for me as Dietz was able to capture the atmosphere of CE aptly within written format.  I wish every mainstream game had a novel depicting its events for better clarity and perspective.

Tobias Buckell - Cole Protocol, Envoy

Tobias should be penned as the de-facto author of anything related to Grey Team  as he essentially gave birth to the group we once knew as a myth.  His approach to writing is always welcomed with nostalgia as it feels adjacent to Nylund's perfectly balancing combat,intertwined relationships/objectives and  world building. I can't help but think he'd be the perfect person to write a Halo 2 novel excluding Joseph Staten himself. 

   Grey Team could have easily been written off as a group of gungho hardasses yet in many ways you could see them as precursors to the SIIIs.  A true and tried group consistently sent behind enemy lines- perhaps to see how much it would take to break Spartans -yet they retain more humanity than their fellow peers tenfold. Each mission they simply do what is needed to survive while going out of their way to assist those in need at any turn, all while balancing their individual desires of autonomy and authority.  Quite the difference of dynamics compared to Blue team who generally reminisce of training days ,Halsey, and the objective ahead.  
 
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Ostral
I'd definitely go with Joe Staten and Troy Denning.

Both of them write alien characters and culture much better than most of the other writers, understanding that they don't basically have one collective personality with a few token outliers. And for a franchise like Halo, interesting and varied non-human characters is very important to me.
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Tacit Axiom
Troy Denning has been doing a really good job so far. His style is a delightful combination of well thought-out worldbuilding & integration with the greater Halo universe and believably human (or alien) characters with realistic and interesting motivations, conflicts and interactions. And on the other hand he's also very back-to-basics as far as the in-universe sandbox is concerned, which was especially apparent in Silent Storm, which doesn't rely on special gadgets, artificially inflated character importance, or Forerunner MacGuffins to tell a good story. If there's some tool or piece of tech that drives the story, it usually arises naturally from the world and it makes sense for it to be there.

Beyond that, Joe Staten's Covenant stuff, from Halo 2 to Contact Harvest to Shadow of Intent, is always excellent. There's some things that could be said about his sense of scale, but he brings a kind of depth and nuance to the Covenant civilization, as well as a "humanity" (for the lack of a better term) to Covenant characters that's simply not there in most portrayals.
halo
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SC Specter
I would have to go with Nylund.  His writing style at least from the perspective of the UNSC better fit a military Sci Fi type book.  I also would have to say I am pretty nostalgic towards him since he essentially crafted the character traits of all the big players in the Halo universe.
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Dibol1987
SC Specter wrote:
I would have to go with Nylund.  His writing style at least from the perspective of the UNSC better fit a military Sci Fi type book.  I also would have to say I am pretty nostalgic towards him since he essentially crafted the character traits of all the big players in the Halo universe.


Not to mention Nylund’s writing style was accessible enough for those that are not wired for the hardcore sci-fi stuff. If it were not for Nylund, I would not have been indirectly exposed to Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card.
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SC Specter
Dibol1987 wrote:


Not to mention Nylund’s writing style was accessible enough for those that are not wired for the hardcore sci-fi stuff. If it were not for Nylund, I would not have been indirectly exposed to Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card.


Oh you know what I completely forgot about that!
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Noble Legend
Yeah I love contact harvest from Joseph Staten I like how he can give you perspective through the grunt and huragok and the fun creative way that the covanent made the  chopper. I also liked Karen Travis in the kilo 5 trilogy aND how she added the perspective of the spartan 2 program victims... 
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DilDev
I think Joseph Staten has the most insight into Halo, seeing as how he helped make it, so in Contact Harvest, you see a lot of cut material from Halo 2 making its way back in. And because of his role as the cinematic director for at least Halo 2 (and others?), his style has a very cinematic feel to it. There's always this sort of camera position that the viewpoint takes. In particular, Dadab's introduction reminds me so much of a tracking shot.
And then Staten's other work, Shadow of Intent, was nothing short of lyrical.

I will be joining Mendicant in on love for The Flood, though perhaps not as unreservedly. There were parts where it felt like Dietz was trying to transcribe every action a player would take to complete a mission and those are rough to get through on rereads. But everything else? Wonderful. I especially love Melissa McKay, without whom I would never have stuck around with the Halo franchise. The Flood was my introduction to Halo, and right in the lead role was this incredible, multidimensional woman. And then there were so many other roles for women too, heroic and cowardly alike. It was immediately a welcoming atmosphere.

I have to give nods each to Matt Forbeck for Legacy of Onyx, John Shirley for Broken Circle, and Tobias Buckell for both "Oasis" and Envoy. Absolutely choice books.
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